An analysis of the generations marriage in their eyes were watching god by zora neale hurston

Hurston first tried to publish it in

An analysis of the generations marriage in their eyes were watching god by zora neale hurston

Historical context[ edit ] Racial Climate in the Early s[ edit ] With legislation like the Jim Crow lawsenacted from tomany African-Americans were disfranchised. Groups like the Ku Klux Klan terrorized black citizens, leading to the steady decline of African-American political representation.

Baptist preacher Thomas Dixon, Jr. The book was so popular that Dixon wrote a trilogy. His second novel, The Clansmanwas adapted for the silent film The Birth of a Nationportraying African-American men in an unintelligent, sexually aggressive light The renaissance was meant to be a liberating response to the restrictive standards of the Racial Uplift program, encouraging writers and artists to expose racist oppression in American society.

In an essay by Nick Aaron Ford, Hurston is quoted to have to said, "Many Negroes criticise my book, because I did not make it a lecture on the race problem. I am interested in you now, not as a Negro man but as a man.

I am not interested in the race problem, but I am interested in the problems of individuals, white ones and black ones. Hurston viewed her work as distinct from the work of fellow Harlem Renaissance writers she described as the "sobbing school of Negrohood" that portrayed the lives of black people as constantly miserable, downtrodden and deprived.

Completely rejecting the Uplift agenda, the magazine also included homoerotic work as well as portrayals of prostitution. Readers receive the story of her life in three major periods corresponding to her marriages to three very different men. Nanny is an elderly woman who, as a slave, was raped by her owner and gave birth to a mixed-race daughter Leafy.

Nanny escaped from her jealous mistress and found a good home after the end of the American Civil War. Nanny tried to create a good life for her daughter, but Leafy was raped by her school teacher and became pregnant with Janie. Eventually, she ran away, leaving her daughter Janie with Nanny.

An analysis of the generations marriage in their eyes were watching god by zora neale hurston

Although Janie is not interested in either Logan or marriage, her grandmother wants her to have the stability she never had; legal marriage to Killicks, Nanny believes, will give Janie opportunities.

Nanny feels that Janie will be unable to take care of herself, so she must marry a man who will take care of her.

However, Killicks wants a domestic helper rather than a lover or partner; he thinks Janie does not do enough around the farm and that she is ungrateful.

Janie speaks to Nanny about how she feels, but Nanny, too, accuses her of being spoiled. Soon afterward, Nanny dies. Unhappy, disillusioned, and lonely, Janie chooses to leave Killicks and runs off with the glib Jody Joe Starks, who takes her to EatonvilleFlorida.

Finding the small town residents unambitious, Starks arranges to buy more land, establishes a general store which he has built by local residents, and is soon elected as mayor of the town.

Janie soon realises that Starks wants her as a trophy wifeto reinforce his powerful position in town.Literary authors, collections of writings, literary criticism, and other related information can be found in both our circulating and reference collections at Middetown Thrall Library.

Seeing as this is an English course, the second aim will be to develop skills necessary for students to be effective readers and writers. The cultivation of these abilities will not only aid students in their exploration of violence in literature, but in any other analytical work they may need to do in the future.

This passage, which opens Their Eyes Were Watching God, establishes the novel’s unusual perspective on gender difference. Because it is the story of a woman and because it was the first major novel published by a black woman, Their Eyes Were Watching God is often classified as a .

Janie, the protagonist of Zora Neale Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God, is often identified as a feminist character. While she is certainly an independent woman who believes in the equality of the sexes, Janie does not lead a typically feminist existence throughout the novel. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston was set in Eatonville, Florida, an independent black town in Florida, where black people were politicians, teachers, and businesspeople rather.

In the messy aftermath of a death in the family (all life is an aftermath), it took me two years to access and gain entrance into my grief. What enabled this entry was exploration into my parents' flight from Vietnam after the Fall of Saigon.

SparkNotes: Their Eyes Were Watching God: Chapters 1–2